• When a film is outright abominable, the reviewer wants to draw out his daggers. He spends time on finding innovative ways to poke at the disgrace. Both cases make for interesting writing experiences.

  • Whether Smith has a thing for emotionally manipulative stories, or this is his version of playing to the awards gallery, he should realize this is not working. It looks like he didn’t learn the right lessons from his Seven Pounds. Hope he does from this one.

  • Arrival is an engaging experience. While the plot might raise many logical questions, it never lets its focus be diverted from the questions it wants you to ask. If not for anything else, this film is a must-watch at least for Amy Adams’ terrific performance.

  • Karan Johar is no heart surgeon. He isn’t the most talented story-teller. But his story’s got heart. And he’s sincere about telling it. He reminds you of that friend who’d dabble in poetry and would recite some in a get-together. You wouldn’t perhaps remember much of it the next day, but if you indulge him he could stop the evening from getting dull. Only difference is, Johar has enough money to get his poems published.

  • Technically the film is below average. The direction is below par, and the film struggles to make a point clearly. Freaky Ali is essentially a badly-written film – golf isn’t cricket or boxing to begin with, and despite the director having three hours, he cannot get you connected with the sport.

  • The movie is well-edited as well (Ninad Khanolkar), and that partially lifts it out of its drab writing. Nevertheless, HBJ is still a small-town saga lacking in novelty, romance and adventure, and less than a riveting watch. You can safely skip this one.

  • Mohenjo Daro is too boring to be a “time-pass” film, and takes facts too trivially to be a “serious” history film. Watch it for the cast and the art direction, maybe the VFX. Better still, don’t watch it at all.

  • Your kids may appreciate this one and that’s largely because they’re a forgiving lot. You might like it if you haven’t watched The Jungle Book. All things considered, you’re not necessarily going to regret avoiding this not-so-legendary Legend.

  • These sort of films aren’t exactly evergreen material. The content, we mean. Crime films, dark films, disturbing films are watched often, but the deal is that the audience needs a certain novelty in presentation. You could call it shock value if there’s emphasis on the negativity, but the idea really is to give the audience a sense of seeing something they’ve not seen before.

  • Udta Punjab isn’t particularly hard-hitting but is, nonetheless, a tender film which ably narrates two engaging stories. Just make sure to pitch your expectations right when you walk into the hall.

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