• The twist in tale is as dubious as the film’s feminism, in how it conveniently aligns with the patriotic mood of the moment. But it still doesn’t thaw a hard-hearted viewer like yours truly.

  • Forget good, there is hardly any music in most of Rock On!! 2. Save in the many flashbacks and in the needlessly protracted climax. The songs and melodies, instead of being well knit in the narrative, seem to stand jarringly outside of it. There is a wisp of a story, narrated in large chunks through that easy, lazy device — a run-of-the-mill voiceover.

  • ADHM is the latest in the brand of cinema that isn’t so much as plot driven as it is focused on characters, relationships and interactions. But all this is executed in a squarely Bollywood way. It’s all about two individuals — Ayan (Ranbir Kapoor) and Alizeh (Anushka Sharma) — thrown unexpectedly together and their journey through friendship/love.

  • There is a consistency of craft in Shivaay that is rarely seen in Hindi cinema. Like its relentless commitment towards slow motion. From the first shot to the last, everything moves s…l…o…w — the bullet that leaves the pistol to the teardrop that falls from the eye. No wonder the film turns out almost three hours long despite just a wisp of a story to tell.

  • There’s nothing nuanced or new in this film about one of the worst pogroms of our times: the anti-Sikh riots of 1984

  • Queen of Katwe stands on its own feet because of its distinct raw rhythm and energy and for rooting itself well in the underprivileged world of Uganda.

  • You can actually see the film in its soundtrack alone. It remains the mainstay and takeaway from the film. It’s a pity then that despite so much happening, so much aspired for in the film, in the end you don’t feel as though you have come back with something substantial.

  • The film catches the game at the grassroots—but instead of the usual portrayal of bureaucratic stranglehold what you see is an unquestioning commitment and passion for the game in the many officials. In a way, the film then becomes a piece of nostalgia, harking back to the innocent days of cricket.

  • That film still speaks to me, while Parched left me thirsting for more; its parts don’t quite add up to a compelling whole.

  • Nothing changes in the fourth of the Raaz franchisee. If at all the chills and thrills seem to run dangerously out of steam and some scenes turn out unintentionally funny.

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