• It’s a compelling story and for the most part it’s well told.

  • …It’s a bit like flat soda. Palatable, but lacking any fizz.

  • Dangal is not a perfect film, but then few films are. It’s overlong at 2 hours and 41 minutes, and it’s both simple and simplistic in places. But it’s a solid and satisfying watch, a well crafted look at what went into the creation of two sporting champions. It’s a film that makes the heart swell… when it isn’t pounding from all the excitement of the bouts.

  • What the film lacks is genuine feeling. Yes, even the frothiest of rom-coms need something real to keep you invested in its characters. Aditya Chopra may have made one of Hindi cinema’s most enduring love stories, but this is a soufflé that sinks like a stone.

  • Although it possesses many of the hallmarks of a classic Disney adventure, the film’s real achievement is in delivering a heroine for our times – smart, brave, independent, opinionated, and one who doesn’t need a romantic interest to feel complete. In doing that, it succeeds where so many other films spectacularly fail.

  • …admirable thing about the film is its attempt to root out the stigma attached to mental health and the shame associated with therapy.
    But these are small gifts in an overlong, disappointing film that misses its mark. Honestly, it’s a slog.

  • Force 2 isn’t unwatchable, and it won’t give you a migraine either. But it is a wildly inconsistent film that fills up the gaps between its many action sequences with ridiculous attempts at humor and drama. Hopefully this franchise ends here.

  • Clocking in at just under two hours, Arrival is that rare film that you don’t want to miss even a moment of. You literally don’t want to blink or look at your phone in the fear of missing out something small, something important. It’s an intelligent film and that’s not a bad thing.

    Don’t read anything more about it. The joy of discovery is beyond everything else.

  • Unlike the early Potter adventures, Fantastic Beasts, the first film in an intended five-part series, is darker, and more suited for older viewers who can grasp the film’s themes of segregation and xenophobia. A subplot involving a religious crazy (Samantha Morton) who mistreats kids and hunts witches might be especially disturbing for young kids.

  • The performances are adequate at best, and the picture-postcard photography of Meghalaya is refreshing. But as you leave the cinema in the end, you can’t help missing the distinct sense of fun that the earlier film delivered…and yes, those infectious tunes. It’s an opportunity lost.

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 509 items)