• To have captured grief with such raw honesty, not just the confusion, but also the rage, is where Bayona has knocked it out of the park. This immense burden – to project the battered heart of this story, to grapple mortality (and morality) has been placed on the young shoulders of Lewis MacDougall, who, it has to be said, is a rare find. Not only does he carry the film for long stretches by himself, he also overshadows the towering Liam Neeson (who has voiced the monster).

  • This is our generation’s Star Wars story. Go own it…

  • Without a journey in which to invest the viewer, the film feels more like an after-the-fight highlights show, than an emotional biopic.

  • It doesn’t reinvent the wheel, but unlike the monumental machine at its centre, works efficiently within its tight confines.

  • La La Land is one of my favourites of all time. Depending on how life has treated you, its final moments will be either devastating or irrecoverably shattering. It’s one of the finest sequences ever put on film.

  • Moana is a terrific Disney movie; vibrant, joyful, with great music and enthusiastic performances. It is steeped in tradition, both of its many legendary predecessors and the colourful culture it celebrates.

  • It’s an annoyingly good-natured film about the meanest, most lawless hellscape on earth: The Internet.

  • Even in regular old 2D, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk was one of the year’s most quietly meditative experiences, respectful, despite the frills. Its success will depend largely on how well it does in the awards season. It’ll fail. But don’t let that deter you.

  • If only the care that was put into the staggering, MC Escher-esque visuals from the final act were put into the characters. If only the fantastic special effects and a strong central performance from Cumberbatch were put in service of a more cohesive script. Maybe then Doctor Strange could’ve been the trippy, psychedelic adventure it always promised to be, and not a middling entry in a 14-film-old franchise.

  • There’s a reason this film isn’t called Cobie Smulders: Never Go Back. It needs to be stripped of all this pretense, and it needs to embrace what it really is: A film that would have been sentenced to an eternity on the 3-for-2 aisle of the local DVD store had Tom Cruise’s face not been on those jingoistic, Trump state posters.

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