• Shweta Tripathi and Nawazuddin Siddiqui front a film about a topic we barely acknowledge, forget showing it in our films. Director Shlok Sharma shows talent.

  • This Aditya Roy Kapur, Shraddha Kapoor film proves Bollywood needs to get more adept at depicting young love. Why do our lovers, so much quicker off the mark when it comes to locking lips, sound so juvenile?

  • It is a little too dark and sparse for little kids, and too obvious for those who have crossed over into adulthood

  • Aamir Khan-starrer works on the twin parameters – as a straight-forward film about a popular sport and those who play it, and as a strong feminist statement.

  • Yes, it’s grid is predictable: in its beginning is its end. But, and this is the strength of the film, it moves past a leaden start, revs it up, and becomes quite entertaining as it goes along.

  • This will also go down as the film which, despite its close clinches, male and female (yesss), its rumpled-bedsheets-and-bedroom-antics, gave us a romance that never ignites. The fire between the lovers is restricted to the songs-and-dances; Ranveer and Vaani don’t burn it up.

  • This Vidya Balan film starts well but starts telegraphing its punches around interval. It becomes predictable and there can be nothing worse for a thriller.

  • Both Shah Rukh Khan and Alia Bhatt show spark but the film needed a plot to hinge the performances. Too many dialogues that say too little take the joy away from the film.

  • Neha Sharma and Aditya Seal star in a love story which is an instant throwback to the first film. But unlike Tum Bin, it fails to mix the elements wisely despite delivering some well executed moments.

  • John Abraham is efficient and does what he needs to, Tahir Raj Bhasin adds complexity to his character. However, much more was needed to rise above the sluggish script.

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 441 items)