• Badhaai Ho doesn’t quite know what it wants us to do more, laugh or cry. And parts of the film sink into sitcom flatness, especially when Sikri overdoes her grumpy ‘saas’ act, though some of her lines are laugh-out-loud.

  • Namaste England is just a plain bad film, in which the ‘desis’ who live in the UK are poor misguided souls, and the real ‘desis’, especially those from good ‘ol Punjab, will rescue the world.

  • Debutant director Rahi Anil Barve has a distinct voice. Tumbbad is a gorgeous looking, intriguing morality tale which both entrances and repulses: it’s not something I will forget.

  • Helicopter Eela is so saddled with banal story-telling, stretched sub-plots and exaggerated performances, including and especially from the lead actress, that it never really takes off.

  • Tabu is marvelous, Sriram Raghavan finally having created a fitting role for this uber-talented actress, whom we really should be seeing much more of. Ayushmann Khurrana is wonderful, too, sinking into his part.

  • The only trouble with the Anushka Sharma and Varun Dhawan’s Sui Dhaaga is its total predictability: you know what’s coming miles before the characters do.

  • The girls in Pataakha take some getting used to: you have to suspend disbelief to take these dusty, filthy-mouthed sisters seriously. But once they start settling into their roles, you cross a hump

  • There is a gap, a curious distance, between the vision and the execution, and much of the film, including Nawazuddin Siddiqui, resides in it.

  • Batti Gul Meter Chalu is a hark-back to a forgotten tradition, which, at its best, gave us story and substance. Batti Gul gives us both, for most part.

  • You want to shake these lovers and ask them to make up their mind, quick. You enjoy the initial exhilaration born out of breathless passion as the winsome boy and girl engage in the age-old dance of desire. And then they become exhausting. As does the film.

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