• There are some interesting flavours here, but Saif Ali Khan’s ‘Chef’ feels derivative, and doesn’t come together as a fully satisfactory dish. And that’s got to do with the uneven writing.

  • With a lot of high-octane drama movies like Bhoomi and Haseena Parkar, this light-hearted comedy by David Dhawan definitely stands a better chance. The Varun Dhawan, Jacqueline Fernandez and Taapsee Pannu starrer is the perfect dose of candyfloss romance, exotic locales and a colourful canvas.

  • Shraddha Kapoor manages the young wife-and-mother part well enough, but her transition to the other side is never fully realized: she appears to be speaking her lines to order and the cheek-pads to add flesh to her jowls, and the deliberately heavier voice, is all put on.

  • Sanjay Dutt’s face is kept in close-up for much of the film, and there is still power in it. This is an actor who can explode off the screen, given the right story. Maybe he needs something better told to vent his anger.

  • It’s rare that an Indian film uses dark comedy to make its points so effectively. ‘Newton’ could also, just as easily, have been called A Day In The Life Of The World’s Largest, Most Complex Democracy. Or, The Great Indian Electoral Circus. Rajkummar Rao is enjoying a purple patch.

  • It is the supporting cast which is spot on, especially Rajesh Sharma and Deepak Dobriyal. But more than anything else, it is the mawkish sentimentality which overcomes the story-telling.

  • Kangana keeps us watching. With her plain unvarnished face, and mobile features, she comes across as a real, solid, complex woman, someone you can reach out and touch. When she’s on the top of her game, helping us ignore so many of the film’s loopholes, she’s glorious. It’s a pity her own story lets her down.

  • The Arjun Rampal starrer has a thickly-populated circuitous plot, which goes back and forth in time, which comes in the way of a solid crime thriller cum study of the making of a gangster.

  • Whenever the plot feels like it, it picks up on Sunny Deol’s punchy dialogues from his past films. This really tired device only serves to remind us of a time when Sunny made watchable films.

  • This comedy of middle-class-Dilli-manners-and-mores suffers from a sit-com flatness. And when everything is meant to make us laugh, you can quite easily deflect attention from the main premise. The Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar film resists the temptation to tart up the ordinary, which is the best part: no one’s calling attention quirky, everyone is real.

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