• Kumar tells his story through a coming-of-age story between two teens — Noor (Zara Webb) and Majid (Shivam Raina) — in an atmosphere of all-pervading gloom where even any semblance of hope becomes everyone’s supreme aim.

  • Batra’s Lunchbox was set to a fast lane and recounts with uncertainty the romance between a couple belonging to differing backgrounds. It’s slow pace is thoughtfully calculate, and should not let the viewer drift away from its basic premise — the monotonous sameness of some people’s lives and their constant yearning for something that must be a welcome relief that could lead to fulfilling their innermost desires.

  • For all its gags and antic situations, this neither comic nor gangster rivalry film, turns into a case of cinema stretchery.

  • Time and again, it has been proved that mere ideation of a great film doesn’t make an engaging narrative.  Director Kapri has claimed that the story is based on a real life incident that he knows of. There are reports that a New York based report could be the trigger for its basic premise. Whatever be the source, you don’t find the idea bizarre or something that is unlikely to take place. All you wish that despite having one of the most endearing and loveable child actors, Pihu doesn’t move forward.     

  • The film is fast-moving and highly kinetic, and the two leads come across as two cocky, grinning rebels full of verve, fantasies and dreams.

  • The worst thing about this film is no connect between characters even as Kapoor tries hard to breathe life into his.

  • Raazi boasts of some splendid performances by even those who have small roles.

  • Poorly scripted, this mystery turns comical at times!

  • Sure, most romantic comedies are predictable, unrealistic and corny, but some films are so bad, they’re actually good.

  • Still the vital definitive crux is marked with slightly long-drawn-out juxtapositions that could debilitate the overall emotional impact of the film.

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