• Kedarnath for being “insensitive” to the 2013 Uttarakhand tragedy and turning it into a metaphor, is a proof that we are content remaining blind to the bigger picture; that we are not far from disaster but sitting right on top of it.

  • Bhaiaji Superhit is nothing more than three yesteryear stars being forced to embrace their own obsolescence.

  • …the filmmaker indulges in with the child, despite getting enraged at her cuteness being exploited to send the adults on a guilt trip, you ultimately know how it will pan out. But 90 odd minutes of it is way too much of a torture, as much for Pihu, as for us.

  • Ambitious in its visual scale, ‘Thugs of Hindostan’ reveals a disappointing lack of heft and flair when it comes to the story and its telling

  • Like Anderson’s 2007 film, The Darjeeling Limited, which set in India, Isle of Dogs has also been accused of cultural appropriation. Beyond the ‘white saviour’ trope of an American exchange student saving the day, one wonders if there’s more to Anderson’s decision of keeping Japanese uninterpreted. There is so much to be read in the film that Anderson’s claim of it originating simply as the story of dogs in a trash island seems like a distant, unimaginable past.

  • The film captures the little, seemingly insurmountable conflicts of a middle class family very well and also its self-righteousness when it comes to matters of sex and its hypocrisies in putting the mother on the pedestal. It’s in conclusions and closures that things get out of hand. The convenient and sentimental “it’s all about loving your family” route doesn’t quite work with the otherwise cheeky tenor at the start of the film. If only it could have remained consistently so.

  • There is a flat, half baked subplot about illegal immigration and the usual righteous show of desh bhakti. And not a single intelligent moment to balance out the daftness on display. Just what were the makers thinking when they were hatching this senseless film in their collective head!

  • The atmosphere, landscape, and themes in ‘Tumbbad’ are accentuated by a sense of Gothic dread and an eerie expectancy of the diabolical

  • All the darkness comes laced with humour. Raghavan takes you to the edge of the seat with the pulse racing, makes you keep guessing even as you are chuckling. Getting outwitted and taken by surprise was never more entertaining. The film completes a perfect arc from where it starts to how it ends. Cabbage, cats and colour red; milestones and rabbits and liver and life all come with a larger meaning attached. Missing the beginning, end and anything in the middle would then severely imperil what could be the most fun you’d have at the movies.

  • Ultimately Sui Dhaaga pans out like Lagaan—a rag tag team hits a sixer on the fashion ramp; the hoi polloi earn the approval of the gentry. It is a tad flat in comparison to the more layered quirkiness of his previous outing, Dum Laga Ke Haisha, but you still care and root for Katariya’s characters and can’t help appreciate the fact that the agent provocateur in this film, as in DLKH, continues to be a woman. To borrow a line from the film itself, despite many hiccups, sab badhiya hai (all is well).

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 137 items)