• However, it appears the training wheels have come off, promising that the next entry in the ‘Fantastic Beasts’ saga will go full throttle into J.K. Rowling’s world of wizards. If nothing else, that’s bound to ensure Potterheads will stay tuned to the franchise.

  • As Malek takes centre stage in the final Live Aid act as Freddie, the director gives you a glimpse of the moments before he takes the podium. The camera follows him like a shadow. It captures his nervous energy, his pulsating drive to entertain once again and the fighter that Freddie Mercury was. There was more to him than his nonconformist, outrageous and wild shindigs. Bohemian Rhapsody celebrates his undying spirit beautifully through his music. From exploring Freddie’s take on mixing genres, innate desire to taking risks, not wanting to ‘fix’ his teeth to doing the good deeds — this one’s an uplifting tearjerker!

  • Some films stay with you for eternity. This one transports you to the moon and back and is as special and introspective as the man it intricately studies but rarely reveres. Brilliantly crafted and hypnotic from beginning to end, First Man is a stunning piece of work that leaves you thinking about it, way after it’s over.

  • Comprising an all Asian American cast, the film focuses on the region’s (Asia) wealth, which is refreshing. Despite its conventional story, ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ is a pretty romantic ride, rich in emotions and Asian in its sensibility and values. It will make you believe in love and what’s meant to be, will be.

  • Open to various interpretations and unpredictable from beginning to end, AndhaDhun is an engaging thriller that keeps you on your toes and leaves you guessing all the way.

  • Watch the film for the director’s flawless interweaving of Manto’s poignant writing into her script and watch it for the words — spoken and unspoken.

  • This otherwise tedious and futile film only seems interesting in scenes where Pichku is accompanied by his street-smart friend Gopi (Aryan Preet). The child actors are good and deserve a film that doesn’t make you unintentionally laugh at their characters’ plight. Paoli Dam also deserves a mention for her thoughtful portrayal of a mother torn between her love for her son and her responsibilities as an adult. However, despite the decent performances, watching a boy’s aversion to stench for almost two hours is anything but relieving.

  • Director Dipesh Jain’s dystopian vision, editor Chris Witt’s clever intercutting of tracks and cinematographer Kai Miedendorp’s attention to detail, make Gali Guleiyan a riveting watch. A spectacular cast led by the inimitable Manoj Bajpayee, comprising talented actors like Ranvir Shorey, Shahana Goswami and Om Singh make you relive the trauma of Idu and Khuddus. If you expect pleasant escapism from the movies, Gali Guleiyan is not for you. At one point Khuddus admits, Main kho gaya hoon.” It pretty much sums up the film’s intent — it hopes to understand a man who feels lost and doesn’t want to be found.

  • Shot in the bylanes of small town India, the film captures the milieu it is set in aptly. The music is the weakest link and the soaring and melodramatic background score in some portions is distracting. Mulk focusses on some hard-hitting and burning issues, while also highlighting the crucial role that the media and various other channels of information play in disseminating the right news and facts to its citizens. It also brings to fore the other faces of terrorism which often gets brushed under the carpet.

  • Karwaan might not be the roller coaster ride you expected it to be, but it leaves you with a warm fuzzy feeling in the heart that says all’s well that ends well.

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