• Super 30 has been shot on studio sets rather than on real locations, so do not look for the real sights and smells of Patna. That is one of the key problems with Super 30: it tells a true story but it never rings true. Nothing in the film is less convincing than the lead performance. The idea to bronze up Hrithik Roshan so that he can impersonate Anand Kumar is anything but super: it is a formula that equals zero.

  • Sinha draws many of its plot elements from newspaper headlines of recent years, the principal one related to the 2014 Badaun gangrape and killing of two girls and the 2016 Una flogging of Dalit men and employs them methodically to probe caste and gender fissures and fault lines. It remains true to the demands of the plot without losing control over its principal purpose – administering a bitter pill with just a hint of a sugar coating. It works wonderfully well. Article 15 is a not to be missed film.

  • Shahid stretches himself very thin trying to convince us that Kabir Singh is a present-day incarnation of Devdas.

  • Game Over, which is presented by Anurag Kashyap, is not without its share of failings, but director Saravanan is clearly endowed with an exceptional sense of the potential of the cinematic medium to probe complex aspects of humanity. Taapsee Pannu, as she has been in her recent outings, is never less than convincing. While she may be the primary reason why you must go out a watch this film, it certainly isn’t devoid of other intrinsic merits in terms of substance and execution.

  • Crowd-Pleaser For Salman Khan Fans Seeking Recompense For Tubelight

  • Tiger Shroff leads a fresh bunch of students in film so last decade in its thinking and packaging that sitting through it is like straying into a Bollywood time warp.

  • Karanvir, Ishita get their moments in the sun but are not allowed any shots at cornering the limelight. That privilege is reserved for Sunny-Karan.

  • The film remains a middling affair because it asks many important questions but answers only a handful with any degree of clarity.

  • Avengers: Endgame strikes emotional chords more frequently than superhero movies usually do. It is almost as if the passing away of the universe that this remarkable franchise has created and sustained over the past decade is leaving behind a massive void. Mercifully, we know that in endings lie many beginnings. If this is how magnificently one cycle has ended, there is every reason to hope that the ones that are in the works will be worth the wait.

  • Kalank has unmistakable contemporary resonance because it celebrates the transformative power of love and reconciliation in a time of rampant discord. It is worth a viewing not only for what it says, but also for how it says it.

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