• David Harbour of Stranger Things does a fine enough job as the brick-red man who emerged from the depths of hell with sawed horns on the forehead, a tail and a metallic hammer-like appendage for an arm.

  • The Jordan Peele directorial is terrifying but muddled…If Get Out portrayed the deep fears of the two delicately poised races, Us goes deeper into the inner-most fears of us all. Us vs them. Us vs us. US vs the world. And the wall vs us.

  • In a world full of wondrous things, wonder is the thing in shortest supply. Burton had a chance to make you believe that a pregnant caged elephant, who has spent her life in circuses, could look at soaring birds through a barred window in envy and what may result is an elephant with flapping ears for wings.

    He squanders it.

  • The story of Hiccup and his Night Fury called Toothless seems stretched and contrived, full of noisy battles, and stuffed with just too many fire-breathing giants.

  • The film’s centrepiece, an Autobot called Chris, makes you feel for every pummelling he takes from the Decepticons chasing him across planets. 

  • Director James Wan seems in an incredible rush, not lingering over any important characters or vital plot points but diving head first into yet another undersea clash.

  • Where Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald scores, and full marks to both JK Rowling and recurring Harry Potter director David Yates here, is in putting their imaginations on screen.

  • Rami Malek puts in an astonishing bit of work getting Freddie right (especially with those teeth), and makes light work of it, his eyes reflecting the hunger the film never sweats to show.

  • The film is at its most entertaining when the night that Grinch strikes eventually draws near.

  • Isle of Dogs is disappointing, in the stereotypes it wields, in the history it seems not to care for, in the clever jokes it can’t resist succumbing to, and ultimately in its treatment of the four-legged species it seems devoted to.

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