• A better film would have done something with the fact that the man Mitch and Hurley end up fighting is a product of the very system that sets people like them out into the world, to ask no questions and do all the bidding. However, American Assassin has little time for such ruminations…

  • What saves the film from collapsing is the acting by the children, who are effortlessly natural, whether they are just being boys or just being scared kids. As the object of their combined admiration, but with horrors of her own Lillis is both boldly aware and heartbreakingly fragile.

  • In parts, and very small parts, the banter between Samuel L Jackson and Ryan Reynolds, two indisputably charismatic actors, is funny and makes you forget a lot else that is going around them.

  • Matthew McConaughey, as the source of the evil that stands contrary to all such good things, slithers through the film in clothes as slick as his gelled hair, and a face that is tanned leather. Some things remain constant, even in multiverse.

  • The pace is so unhurried, and Shortland captures so much of the passing time in slow motion and caressing visuals, that it takes away from how humiliating her situation is for Clare.

  • Apart from the two leads, played by DeHaan and Delevingne, the film doesn’t do any justice to any of its other actors. Be it Owen, reduced to the kind of showy military uniform that never comes to any good or a kohl-eyed Hawke, who will hopefully return if this film spawns into a series.

  • This Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal, Nawazuddin Siddiqui-starrer is a whole dance-action genre has nothing great about it. Tiger Shroff as Munna Michael dance, Munna fights, Munna dance and fight together, this is what he is doing in the film.

  • Christopher Nolan is telling you about defeat, the blood, sweat and tears of it; how it settles into your bones, sets in your face, moves your clawing fingers, hardens your scared heart. The writer-director, who loves playing with time, again tells the story of that week in a non-linear sequence.

  • It is an impressive film, technologically astounding, and it is a hardworking film, with the camera striving to capture every puff of the nostril of its apes. But that doesn’t necessarily make it a particularly great film.

  • If a film can still be made where a person spreads the prayer mat and then dances around it playing video games, where Anupam Kher can play a Pakistani dad, where one can say that he doesn’t know whether one believes or not in Allah, and where a mother can pack meat biryani for the road, all is well.

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