• The film’s centrepiece, an Autobot called Chris, makes you feel for every pummelling he takes from the Decepticons chasing him across planets. 

  • Director James Wan seems in an incredible rush, not lingering over any important characters or vital plot points but diving head first into yet another undersea clash.

  • Where Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald scores, and full marks to both JK Rowling and recurring Harry Potter director David Yates here, is in putting their imaginations on screen.

  • Rami Malek puts in an astonishing bit of work getting Freddie right (especially with those teeth), and makes light work of it, his eyes reflecting the hunger the film never sweats to show.

  • The film is at its most entertaining when the night that Grinch strikes eventually draws near.

  • Isle of Dogs is disappointing, in the stereotypes it wields, in the history it seems not to care for, in the clever jokes it can’t resist succumbing to, and ultimately in its treatment of the four-legged species it seems devoted to.

  • It’s Ryan Gosling himself whom Neil Armstrong may have approved of. Gosling also efficiently navigates the various roles expected of him.

  • An enjoyable affair…Michelle Yeoh as Eleanor, the stern matriarch of the Young family, is quite credible, aware at all times about the hard battle she has waged to be accepted too, and the thin foundation on which this rests.

  • Tom Hardy film dissapoints…The good-looking and talented Tom Hardy, who should be a walk-in for this role, inhabits it half-heartedly as an unshaven, unwashed reporter who botches the one investigation any newsman with half his credentials would know how to approach.

  • Nila Madhab Panda gives us a film about urban wretchedness in easily digestible drawing-room gollops.

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