• To summarise, treat yourself this week with a trip to 2049. You may return with more questions than before you went in, but at least it’ll make you think.

  • With little going on to redeem this Bond-riffing spy sequel (unless you’re an Elton John fan), we recommend a re-watch of the first film, instead.

  • Spider-Man: Homecoming stands to go down in history as the movie that did right by one of the most iconic characters to ever have been created, super-hero fatigue be damned.

  • What Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 ultimately is all about is family and the central human yearning to find its tribe. And while other superheroes may be busy saving the world and smashing buildings and entire planets to the ground, the guardians are just trying to find themselves and where they belong, saving the world along the way. And if you think about it, aren’t we all?

  • All in all, a more than interesting attempt at creating a character driven reboot that talks well, both, to newcomers and old fans, Power Rangers is a must-watch this weekend.

  • Apart from the final denouement, a thrilling, bold risk taken by director Daniel Espinosa and writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick (most famous for last year’s Deadpool), Life dies a quiet death for its lazy writing and an uninspired plot.

  • Watch this movie if you’re ready to endure creepy-crawlies fight each other repeatedly against a scenic backdrop for two hours.

  • Logan is simple proof of just how much good an R-rating can do for a film. Because haven’t we all dreamt of how great it would be to watch Wolverine REALLY use his claws? In James Mangold’s Logan, Hugh Jackman’s much older Wolverine, who despite saying he’s left behind the world of violence, leaves a body count higher than all of his previous movies combined. He also swears a lot, has an alcohol problem, and is consumed by rage and bitterness.

  • Rogue One: A Star Wars Story sets the benchmark of how a good standalone film can be made without ruining a tight story with unnecessary sequels; compact, forceful, well-intentioned and hugely entertaining, the film is a story for the ages.

  • All in all, director Justin Lin’s take on J.J. Abrams’ reboot of the franchise, while taking it back to basics, fails to do little else but give you the faint promise of excitement, but never fully delivering.

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