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Shakti: The Power

Shakti: The Power Poster

Critic Rating

-

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Audience Rating

7.5
1 Review
2 Ratings

Movie Info

Running Time

Language

Hindi

Synopsis

Shekhar (Sanjay Kapoor) and Nandini (Karisma Kapoor) are friends living in Canada with their two uncles. Shekhar proposes to Nandini and she says yes and now they have a young son named Raja. Shekhar hears breaking news of violence in India, the family journeys to his ancestral house in rural North-East State of India and Nandini is shocked to see that Shekhar's family is embroiled in feudal gang wars. Shekhar's father is Narasimha (Nana Patekar). Shekhar tries to bring peace between the warring gangs, but is attacked by the rival gang & killed on way to a re-conciliatory meeting that he wanted to attend on his father's behalf. Nandini feels insecure and decides to leave India with her son but Narasimha imprisons them. Desperate to escape, she goes on a difficult journey to return to Canada with the help of Shekhar's mother and sister. Wanted by Narasimha, Nandini seeks help from drifter Jai Singh (Shahrukh Khan) who after hesitation, helps her and her son board a train to Jaipur. Will Nandini be able to return to her home? Or will Narasimha capture her?Wikipedia

Shakti: The Power Reviews

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Audience Reviews for Shakti: The Power

  • Rahul Dutt
    Rahul Dutt
    13 reviews
    Senior Reviewer
    8

    An insane moviegoing experience; possibly the death of cinema

    Seeing this movie was the most fun I've had at the cinema in a long time. However, I am not able to say whether this is a good or a bad film, because such simple qualifications simply cannot be applied.
    This picture has everything any movie could ever have. It has characteristics of a romantic comedy, a political commentary, a thriller, a drama, an action movie, a musical, and an absurdist self-conscious art film. It's all in there, adding up to a myth.
    The basic premise is about an Indian couple, Nandini (Karishma Kapoor) and Shekhar (Sanjay Kapoor), happily living in Canada, who rush to India to visit the husband's parents after a disturbing news report. The rest of the story takes place in India, where the couple find themselves in the midst of a plot of fratricidal violence. At one point, the story borrows from "Not without my baby," but to call Shakti a remake of anything would be an injustice.
    The ostensible story line takes a backseat to a number of astonishing interruptions, including Shah Rukh Khan's dream of Aishwarya Rai which comes as if out of another movie. In fact, the two stars are on all the posters, but they appear really late in the film, and only Shah Rukh ends up being a real character. Yet he makes up for it with a spirited and truly unexpected performance.
    Karishma Kapoor is the one with most work to do in this film, and she does an admirable job, having to link up the film's twists and turns with a show of believable emotion. Another notable presence is Nana Patekar, who plays Narsimha, the tyrannical father of the husband Shekhar. Nana Patekar dominates every scene he's in with a scary but nuanced character.
    The movie is not without its share of realism. Violence is rampant, but truly disturbing in the abuse received by most of the female characters, with Karishma getting soundly beaten on a number of occasions. At times, this violence is clearly disturbing but ultimately it becomes surreal as every dramatic sequence is usually followed by such comic and spectacular turns that the overall effect is nothing but cathartic.
    I have seen a share of Bollywood releases, and the mixing of genres and incredible plot resolutions are certainly their norm. But "Shakti" raises the bar by absorbing an even greater masala without becoming ridiculous. It is a film that achieves the grandeur of a Shakespearian tragedy, where the audience of the rabble and royalty is equally entertained. It is pure, gratuitous cinema, and the director Krishna Vamsi must have had a dream of a good time by throwing in every trick in the book. Perhaps, the all-important message of violence begetting violence and the inspiring extents of motherly love were not the thoughts on my mind, but I came out of watching "Shakti" exhilarated. Making movies can be the most fun in the world

    November 26, 16