• Tumbbad is inspired by the works of Marathi horror writer Narayan Dharap. At the screening I was at, someone during the interval remarked, “It seems like a Marathi film.” I don’t know how he meant it but I take that as a compliment because even though the language spoken is Hindi, the atmosphere of the Konkan is so rich and the period details so well executed, that you feel it’s Marathi.

    I left the theatre with images swirling in my head and a few questions that the film doesn’t answer. Which is not a bad thing.

  • Kajol and Riddhi Sen feature in this story about a middle-aged, middle-class woman who must rediscover herself and find a life outside of her son. It’s a worthy idea but the narration is almost entirely lacking in insight or authenticity

  • Kajol and Riddhi Sen feature in this story about a middle-aged, middle-class woman who must rediscover herself and find a life outside of her son. It’s a worthy idea but the narration is almost entirely lacking in insight or authenticity

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  • Director Ruben Fleischer tries to make this Tom Hardy, Riz Ahmed starrer thrilling and funny but the screenplay has little that is inventive or original

  • The most mystifying part of LoveYatri is Aayush’s hair, which rises a good three to four inches above his head. At one point, I wondered – what does it take to keep that up? Yes, this is that sort of film.

  • Sriram Raghavan’s thriller is about a blind pianist (Ayushmann Khurrana) who gets accidentally embroiled in a murder

  • So Sui Dhaaga: Made In India is unsatisfying but also poignant. I think the best analogy might be Anu Malik’s song in the film – Chaav Laaga, which isn’t as soul stirring as Moh Moh Ke Dhaage from Dum Laga Ke Haisha – but it’s still worth listening to.

  • J.P. Dutta’s film, based on a military operation against the Chinese at the Nathu La Pass in Sikkim in 1967, is structurally clumsy, bland and flat-out tedious

  • There is enough to admire in Dipesh Jain’s ambitious first film about a lonely paranoiac living in Old Delhi – especially the unstinting talent of Manoj Bajpayee

  • Navaniat Singh’s film tries to be a comedy, an Ayurveda commercial, a plea for national integration, a love story and a moral science lesson. Dharmendra still has dollops of charm but even he or Sunny Deol’s iconic ‘dhai kilo ka haath’ can’t lift this incoherent film

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