• If the dismal unravelling of the film’s plot isn’t oppressive enough, its tone-deaf screenplay will dance on every last nerve. The comic relief is centred around an ex-military man’s Tourette’s syndrome. Director Black not only let his friend, a known sex offender, be a part of his film but he allowed lines like “tone down the psychosis” and “his son is retarded” to make the final cut. The Predator is a let down on so many counts that any and all redeeming factors go unnoticed while its mammoth flaws haunt your memory long after this debacle of a film is over.  

  • There’s random sex, flirtation and dropping of the sari pallu — none of which is aesthetically pleasing. The film has no memorable songs either and even fails to move you with a cover of the popular Lata Mangeshkar song, Lag Ja Gale. With a hint of another sequel, either Dhulia takes a hard look at the relevance of this franchise, or convinces Salman Khan for a ‘he is the bhai’ edition and mint money.

  • McQuarrie who has also written Fallout, crafts a rewarding blockbuster, succeeding in pushing the envelope with the right dose of humour, an unprecedented amount of action and an explosive bang’s worth of entertainment for your buck.

  • As is obvious, Skyscraper’s premise is pretty stretched. Plus, a suspension of disbelief is imperative to avoid sniggering at director Rawson Marshall Thurber’s audacious stunts. But in the end, that inevitable, pesky gasp will creep in when Sawyer’s hand slips on a railing and he’s dangling thousand feet in the air.

  • Think of the scariest thing that has happened to you, whether it’s rightfully paranormal or something spooky. Multiply that by about a million times and you’ll know the visceral dread that Hereditary leaves you with long after the credits roll.

  • Fallen Kingdom is an incredibly good-looking sequel that fails to take the story forward. It’s a disappointing lead-up to the next episode that might not be required after what we’ve seen.

  • Solo: A Star Wars Story is a mildly entertaining backstory to one of the most seminal characters in popular culture. We only wish questions that were never asked weren’t answered in such excruciating detail.

  • The plot doesn’t actually reinvent the wheel and yet it dominates the screenplay. Reynolds’ sequel — because let’s be honest, it really is all his doing — is one of those incredibly fun and lewd gifts that keep on giving. And you certainly won’t stop taking it all in; double entendres and all.

  • But is Infinity War the best Marvel film to day? Not really. With standalone ventures, the scope of a languid pace is a more balanced approach. Two-and-a-half-hours is a long time to be constantly sitting on the edge of a seat.

  • The film’s saving grace is the focused recreation of the actual rescue that unfortunately gets diluted because of Padilha’s decision to swiftly cut between it and the Minus 16 performance. What does help immensely is the dance’s soundtrack, the powerful Hebrew passover song, ‘Echad Mi Yodea’. Though not a lengthy film, it’s too excruciating a wait to get to the good parts of 7 Days in Entebbe.

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 25 items)