• Half Girlfriend is a film that makes you laugh and cry – you laugh at the folly of wasting your time on it, and cry tears of exasperation. If you want to watch people playing basketball and falling in love, we recommend renting Kuch Kuch Hota Hai instead – at least that one has some nostalgia added in.

  • Bahubali: The Conclusion positively glows in comparison to contemporary Indian films. The visuals are awe-inducing, the fights breathtaking, and the film overall jaw-dropping. It’s just that you wish Rajamouli had cared a little less about getting jaws to drop and a little more about getting hearts to beat.

  • If you’ve seen the original or intend to at some point, give Begum Jaan a miss. Although, a first-rate Vidya Balan act is reason you shouldn’t.

  • Passing this one off even as a one-time watch would be being very, very liberal.

  • Naam Shabana works because of some wonderful acting by Taapsee Pannu, Akshay Kumar and Anupam Kher, and some breathtaking aerial shots of Vienna, Kuala Lumpur and Mumbai. If you’re a fan of any of the leads, by all means head for the nearest cinema screening this one. And if you leave dejected by the entirety of it, well, you were warned.

  • Phillauri is an entertaining watch – though it would probably help if you’re along for Kanan’s “trip” of choice.

  • Pace aside, I often found myself slowing down to look at the details. Like how a black night frame is lit in amber fire and I just want to see those faces in that glow. Or like how Bhardwaj’s version of Jana Gana Mana plays out – stirring, yet disarming. All too often, the frames and the score knit into each other like they were conceived together in the same beautiful mind. And that beautiful mind, even with its scars, shines bright at anyone who cares to look into the window to its world.

  • …the good news is that we left the hall with one single happy thought – the film works.

  • Although Jolly LLB 2 doesn’t feature the most inventive court trial in Indian cinema history, it is certainly high on tragedy, raw emotions, morals and starkness of justice, and will appeal to both the thinking and the commercial audiences.

  • Kaabil has most of the right ingredients for a thriller – a cerebral protagonist, clever fight sequences, some scattered wit, brilliant casting and immersive screenplay among others. The fight choreography and methodologies, and Rohan’s whole blind-fighter role have the bearing of Daredevil or Batman. A little meandering in the direction in the second half, the pointless item number and some holes in logic at the end spoil what might otherwise been a remarkable film, but Kaabil is still worth a one-time watch.

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 47 items)