• JHMS is a happy romantic comedy that you can sing and dance along with. Pritam’s music is a stand out feature. The performances are really strong. The film’s dramatic soul rests in Imtiaz Ali’s usual Sufi belief where the story and characters tell you that the universe transpires to make lovers meet. That what you’re looking for is looking for you. If romance excites you, this one’s got all the right notes.

  • Indu Sarkar is no satire or subliminal piece on the history of Indian politics. It takes too many cinematic liberties, but thankfully its focus on the strong female lead lends it credibility and keeps the jingoism curbed. The performances are certainly its strength. Thankfully its rights outnumber its wrongs, making it an engaging watch for sure. 

  • Had the screenplay of Berlin Syndrome not taken so many liberties, it could’ve been a modern classic. Even though it falls short of greatness, it still is head and shoulders above the average thriller.

  • Director Alankrita Shrivastava has crafted a bold and beautiful film. It showcases a serious problem with society with the right amount of élan. It takes a heavy subject and presents it with alacrity. This film affirms your faith in girl power. Its a definite must watch.

  • Chris Nolan’s films are also generally apolitical and the fact that he’s managed to stay that way with Dunkirk, a World War II saga is spectacular. The underlying critique of war and focus on survival and hope is what makes this film so great. Dunkirk isn’t just an old war epic, this is a certified movie watching experience that cannot be missed.

  • But what makes this film more than just a sensational piece of cinema is its reflection into relationships. Four stories get intertwined as the characters keep crossing paths. While the narrative isn’t always crystal clear, the emotions are strong and the story of Shab is its strength.

  • Jagga Jasoos doesn’t get its heart in the right place. And that’s just disappointing. 

  • Guest Iin London is shot entirely in foreign locations, so there’s a bit of a fresh vibe to the setting. While that works in favour of the film, the comedy just isn’t good enough. Ajay Devgn makes a brief cameo, but despite all attempts at making this film a masala entertainer, it never manages to rise above a trite script and some lackluster execution. Even if this film had good music, there would’ve been a silver lining to talk about. But there are no such redeeming qualities at all. 

  • The biggest problem with the film is that the second half deviates from the dark and delicious themes of the first, to indulge in the revenge drama track. While the situations in the second half are written with perfect logic, they are bit lofty. The action and the suspense approach distracts from the much more powerful story of mother, daughter and a family slowly nursing itself out of tragedy. But that’s how it plays out. The crucial moment in the climax though, makes it all worth the while. Mom is quite literally a thrill-a-minute ride. Its scenes are powerful and the best part is, the effort put in by the actors. Director Ravi Udyawar crafts an intense, taut and gratifying thriller. It’s a must watch.

  • …there’s never been a Spider-Man movie quite as good as this one. Tobey Maguire’s first film comes close. But then Jon Watts’ homecoming serves up a seriously impressive final scene between Tony Stark, Peter Parker, Pepper Potts and Jon Favreau’s Happy (Stark’s Man Friday). Its action looks way more authentic and intense than any Spidey movie before. The humour and quick witted dialogue of the film are phenomenal. It’s a great build up movie to Avengers: Infinity War. And then there’s the case of Marisa Tomei. Some things in life just make you go ‘bellissima!’

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