• For a love story, there are no romantic tracks that really hold your attention. Apart from the song Namo Namo, Amit Trivedi’s music doesn’t create the required mood for a love saga like Kedarnath. Director Abhishek Kapoor’s attempt to make a film set against the backdrop of a natural calamity of this proportion is ambitious and sincere.

  • The problem with Thugs Of Hindostan is that it’s too long by modern standards. What could have been a crisp adventure drags on and on. We all like swashbucklers and despite the Pirates Of The Caribbean overtones, it could yet have been an engrossing film if it was edited properly.

  • Apart from the stray funny moments and consistently good visuals (thanks to decent CGI efforts), ‘TOH’ doesn’t really have the punch or the thrill that is required to pull off a film of this scale. At 2 hours and 45 minutes, the film feels a little too long and that’s down to the problematic editing. The grand canvas of the film does hold sway in terms of the visual experience, but at the end, this one is all show and no substance. With the mammoth expectations attached to this movie, the end experience just leaves you all at sea.

  • Baazaar uses plenty of stock market jargon and showcases complex ideas like insider trading and financial manipulation with ease. It’s great to see an edgy story unfold in completely new settings in a Hindi film. The movie has a lot of hustle and power play from the world of industrialists, politicians and money brokers, and that makes for a smart investment, especially for movie buffs.

  • ‘Badhaai Ho’, much like its subject, puts a fantastic new spin on the usual. In a new-age rom-com, you’d expect Ayushmann and Sanya’s love story to take centre stage, but when you see the middle-aged parents blush with romance, the entertainment really becomes novel.

  • ‘Namaste England’ is shot in some beautiful locations across India and Europe, but the exotic setting is let down by the predictable and uninspired writing.

  • ‘Namaste England’ is shot in some beautiful locations across India and Europe, but the exotic setting is let down by the predictable and uninspired writing.

  • Tumbbad is a moody and atmospheric film. Some viewers may find the film a little too deep and disturbing, but fans of Hollywood horror films will be reminded of memorable movies in the genre like Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) and Eraserhead (1977). This one is genuinely scary.

  • Vishal Bhardwaj, as he always does with his films, has tried to put many quirky spins into this comedy. The music is rustic, but very pleasing. He has also provided an interesting background score. During the second half, as the film briefly explores a psychological reason for the sisters’ tendency to fight, the sci-fi sounding background music adds a delightful touch to the proceedings. But for all its wonderful and creative touches, Pataakha still feels like a story that stretches a short concept, for a little too long.

  • With a tighter runtime and more focus on the crux of the story, this social drama had the potential to shine bright. The cinematography by Anshuman Mahaley manages to capture the beauty of Uttarakhand’s hills very well. The movie also has a parallel track of two characters named Vikas and Kalyan, narrating the story, but the metaphor doesn’t quite click. BGMC loses power under the load of its heavy-duty screenplay.

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 305 items)