• Through all its hiccups if there’s one thing that glues the film’s bits together, it’s Ayushmann Khurrana’s uninhibited, confident performance as Karam aka Pooja. He brings grace and dignity to the kind of role that has been reduced to a drag cliché on so many of television’s reality and comedy shows. He makes the film work even when the script fails it repeatedly.

    Go in with modest expectations and you may not be disappointed.

  • The film is all about its characters, frankly, and the hoops they’re made to jump. In them you’ll likely find traces and memories of your own youth. I’m going with three-and-a-half out of five for Chhichhore; it’s good, harmless fun. I had a big smile plastered on my face throughout, and I think you will too.

  • The impressively staged but ultimately exhausting action sequences take up the bulk of screen time, but they can’t salvage this soulless film that has all the depth and emotional wallop of a video game.

  • Super 30 comes with an important message but the overwrought treatment weighs it down ultimately.

  • Game Over has some genuinely suspenseful moments, one terrific jump scare, but also a ridiculous sentimental track that sticks out like a sore thumb in a brisk thriller. The makers have some interesting things to say about violence towards women and the residue it can leave. There’s a lot going on, but barring its leading lady’s impressive performance, it’s simply hit and miss.

  • In the end Bharat is exhausting and pointless. It exists only to add to the legend of Salman Khan as the selfless provider, the man who has a heart as big as his biceps. In Bharat, Salman Khan plays Bhai.

  • Ultimately, watching De De Pyaar De is a frustrating experience because while there are things to admire, including the unconventional ending, there is no escape from the lazy stereotypes, the simplistic moralizing, and the episodic, sitcom-style screenplay. Yes I laughed, and it made me think. Some bits crackle too, but the film needed more of that.

  • And when it’s time to bid farewell to old friends, you’ll be fighting back tears. What more do you want from a film? Watch it on the largest screen you can find.

  • Just shy of three hours Kalank is ultimately tiring and heartbreaking even. You can see the talent on screen. If only there was a sharper script to harness it.

  • The writing doesn’t pack the emotional urgency of The Lunchbox, and the characters aren’t as compelling. There is a delicate quality to the central relationship but it never takes flight. Batra keeps the story on slow-burn; how you wish he’d stirred things up from time to time.

    In the end Photograph feels oddly out of focus.

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