• For a film that ebbs and flows, the leads thankfully keep it afloat and steady. Rajput is wonderful as Mansoor, using his eyes and body language to convincingly convey his character’s emotions. But the true revelation is Khan, whose performance makes it hard to believe that this is her first film. She acts like a veteran, is a natural in front of the camera and handles the emotional scenes with ease. She is the most memorable thing about “Kedarnath”.

  • Myra Vishwakarma is adorable, but it is unsettling to think that she had to enact all these horrifying scenes. That a child should have to go through such traumatic scenarios for the sake of a few scares seem wrong.

  • Khan is the only one having fun in this film, but that is partly because his character is so irreverent. Everyone else is overwrought, and the run time of three hours is an ordeal. “Thugs of Hindostan” is a sinking ship, and not even Aamir Khan and his Midas touch can salvage it.

  • It’s ironic that a film that shows a 50-year-old woman getting pregnant makes it about everyone else but her. We see her pregnancy from the perspective of her husband, her kids, her mother-in-law and even the neighbour – everyone except her own. It is the film’s one great failing. If you can forgive that, then “Badhaai Ho” is a satisfying ride.

  • Nothing about “Namaste England” is redeemable. This is 135 minutes of mediocrity that you would do well to avoid.

  • The rain never stops in Rahi Anil Barve’s “Tumbbad”. It pelts the ground relentlessly, rendering everything else insignificant and giving the film an eerie atmosphere and a sense of foreboding. This gloom is what gives the film its best attribute – atmospherics. Barve’s film is redolent with a texture and detail that is rare in Indian films.

  • This film truly belonged to the 80s. It’s a shame that Bollywood hasn’t moved on when audiences clearly have.

  • Bollywood doesn’t make too many thrillers and when it does, they don’t always measure up. “Andhadhun” ticks all the right boxes. This one should be savoured.

  • The film falters when it moves away from being an intimate portrait and takes to grandstanding to find a solution to Mamta and Mauji’s problems. The convoluted plot is a drawback, but much like a tapestry, the beauty here lies in the detail, in the small things. And in this respect, “Sui Dhaaga” is a winner.

  • “Pataakha” should have been a short film, but it got inexplicably extended into a 136-minute full length feature. Much like his protagonists, Bhardwaj doesn’t know when to cut it short and walk away.

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