• The constant issue in Half Girlfriend is its wimpy characters and the contrivances they resort to arrive at its predictable conclusion.
    Stupidity is responded with equal, if not more, stupidity…

  • Everything that I dislike about Bindu could also be used to her advantage in creating an unapologetic, compulsive attention seeker. Except under Roy and Sengupta’s infuriatingly daft and regressive outlook, Meri Pyaari Bindu relapses into indefensible stupidity. 

  • Better viewed as a whole instead of parts, Baahubali is a spectacular achievement, which not only deserves its place in history but also proves filmmakers should dream big and more often.

  • In a performance marked by amazing maturity and restraint, the actress conveys the dark, brooding and internal process of recuperating from grief and finding closure.

    It’s obvious she feels strongly about Maatr’s theme and her sturdy ambition is the only thing that holds your interest even when the film does not.

  • So long it’s true to its confection roots, Noor works, thanks to the attractive bonhomie Gill and Kohli’s real guy appeal generates around Sonakshi’s star. But when it engages in shallow activism for the heck of it, it rambles and drags. 

  • The shabbily picturised sequence of women blindly firing into nowhere upholds Begum Jaan’s flimsy, ill-defined rebellion where Mukherjee draws epic parallels to their resistance.

    It is as reckless as Radcliffe’s.

  • Mukti Bhawan is as much about its characters embracing the inevitability of death as it is about their loved ones grappling with conflicting emotions

  • Funny how after dodging dramatic vigour like a shortcoming, even at places where it would be viewed as benefit, Lal succumbs to a gimmick of a climax. The special effects are seamless but for a story that circles around a spirit it’s a pity how little one sees of it in the movie. 

  • Trapped mocks the invincibility we assume to have acquired as residents of this magical city by painting Mumbai as a distant, dark and depressing land taken over by concrete zombies. Where everything that one craves in Mumbai — space, privacy, view, trees or people minding their own business — seem like a curse.

    Trapped is not an easy film to stomach.

  • There’s more unintended hilarity and very little combat to justify the existence of a sequel. And while Jammwal definitely can score in the daredevil department, he needs a script much more robust than his physique for the viewer to endure everything between the stunt scenes.

    Commando 2’s endlessly mindless proceedings do not come anywhere close to fulfilling that criterion.

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