• Rami Malek does his best as the iconic Freddie Mercury but could still not save the film that is only looking to make the people sing along to Queen’s hit songs and give a superficial look at their story.

  • There are some laughs in this loony comedy about a female ghost who kidnaps men, though the film had the potential to be much smarter.

  • The action set pieces also suffer in comparison to Vishwaroopam. If that film had the thrilling sow motion fight sequence, this time Kamal takes upon himself to have close quarter combats over and over again. Brutal and violent, the fights get tiring after a while.

    That, however, is not the biggest problem of Vishwaroopam. That indubitably is Kamal directing the film as a director and not filmmaker. We can see the savvy politician Kamal is doing great onscreen. Wisam, unfortunately, is lost in the back ground.

  • This film takes an important step in defining terrorism and underlining the differences between a suspect and a criminal. It succeeds in intent and purpose, but sadly fails when it comes to storytelling.

  • Kaala works really well as a film and as a Rajinikanth vehicle; it would be wise to leave the politician outside the theatres though.

  • Coco’s theme about the final death, when one fades from the memory of people, is a poignant one and yet the plot moves along at a steady clip. Nowhere, despite the depth of its ideas, does the film become ponderous. In fact, as unlikely as this may seem, you’ll find yourself thinking of this movie long after it’s ended.

  • Despite painting a very realistic canvas of issues that plague people’s domestic life such as ego fights and the likes, Suresh’s story seems a bit too clumsily wrapped leaving several loopholes in the narrative.

  • Bhumi Pednekar aces it as a homely, yet feisty, new bride while Akshay Kumar tries to present the issue in all its complexity. Toilet Ek Prem Katha looks promising and the film’s pace keeps the audience engaged. However, one thing that can hamper Toilet Ek Prem Katha’s impact is its repetitiveness.

  • Baahubali is a delight for all those who enjoy cinema as a visual medium, there is not much else, though.

  • Coffee With D is like an unfinished unpolished version of what could have been a rollicking run-in into a ruminative session between Indian’s biggest fugitive and loudest journalist. If only it had been allowed more leg-space to lunge in the lap of the ludicrous.

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