• This film takes an important step in defining terrorism and underlining the differences between a suspect and a criminal. It succeeds in intent and purpose, but sadly fails when it comes to storytelling.

  • Kaala works really well as a film and as a Rajinikanth vehicle; it would be wise to leave the politician outside the theatres though.

  • Coco’s theme about the final death, when one fades from the memory of people, is a poignant one and yet the plot moves along at a steady clip. Nowhere, despite the depth of its ideas, does the film become ponderous. In fact, as unlikely as this may seem, you’ll find yourself thinking of this movie long after it’s ended.

  • Despite painting a very realistic canvas of issues that plague people’s domestic life such as ego fights and the likes, Suresh’s story seems a bit too clumsily wrapped leaving several loopholes in the narrative.

  • Bhumi Pednekar aces it as a homely, yet feisty, new bride while Akshay Kumar tries to present the issue in all its complexity. Toilet Ek Prem Katha looks promising and the film’s pace keeps the audience engaged. However, one thing that can hamper Toilet Ek Prem Katha’s impact is its repetitiveness.

  • Baahubali is a delight for all those who enjoy cinema as a visual medium, there is not much else, though.

  • Coffee With D is like an unfinished unpolished version of what could have been a rollicking run-in into a ruminative session between Indian’s biggest fugitive and loudest journalist. If only it had been allowed more leg-space to lunge in the lap of the ludicrous.

  • The BFG is by no means Spielberg’s best work. In fact, it probably won’t even make the top ten. But that’s not because it’s bad, or even mediocre – it’s just that over the course of 4 decades and dozens of great films, Steven Spielberg – with his friends cinematographer Janusz Kaminski, editor Michael Kahn and composer John Williams – has spoilt us.

  • Now You See Me 2 is, in many ways, exactly the sort of sequel everyone dreads: Needless, uninspired and empty. Even with expectations in check, it somehow manages to disappoint. Like its flamboyant heroes, it relies on the notion that you are too dumb to notice illusion from reality.

  • As with most horror, The Conjuring 2 is also very participatory. Those looking for a good time will probably convince themselves that a few scenes are scarier than they really are. It’ll play well at midnight screenings, horror movie marathons, and other situations where there is no option but to have a great time. But something tells me that its appeal will be restricted to only the most hardcore fans of the first film. Without an emotional core to latch on to, everyone else will probably be left underwhelmed.

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