• The film doesn’t make much of an impact on that count either. A couple of good jokes are watered down because the spontaneity dies a long death. It is as if the writers knew the weight of the punch line and slowed the reveal down. It literally transitions in slow motion! And this is only the beginning of the drama. The bright and loud town in Bihar builds up to an inevitably typical climax that made me want to scream, “nahhhhiiiiiiii.” Of course, that would fall to deaf ears, so you just sit through hoping against hope that all your predictions fail. Instead, the film slips and falls while bruising the viewer’s senses.

  • Anyway, as far as addressing mental illnesses goes, Judgementall Hai Kya doesn’t do any more harm than already done by Hindi movies, even if it doesn’t aim at respecting the affected individuals’ fate either. For that, I am grateful. Small mercies. In fact, the social cause is not on its priority list, and it works in the film’s favour. It aims to be a thriller and thrill it does not unless you call 2-inch long, flying cockroaches appearing on-screen thrilling.

  • …a film is not just made by the director or a handful of his supporting producers. It is also about the hundreds of others involved, and in this case, it is also about the man who has worked for almost two decades in guiding disadvantaged geniuses to their rightful places.

  • Kalank can be watched for its overall decent attempt at creating a visual experience, at taking the story beyond its usual one-line plot level, at paying some attention to character-writing and dialogue.

  • The humor is not always slapstick and every once in a while the action makes you sit up and watch, despite awful CGI and editing.

  • When a review becomes more about the viewer’s experience, emotions and thought-flow, it is a movie well-made, a movie one must watch. Even if you might want to watch it over and over again.

  • It is a shame then that this already engaged frame of mind isn’t capitalised upon. It becomes a regular Ajay-Devgn-plays-honest-guy vs. bad-guy routine. Except of course, that it is based on a true life story.

  • The focus is clearly the story, or to take it a level further – the invention and the social milieu that called for the invention.

  • Not that punch-lines, strong opinions or style was ever unenjoyable in Kashyap films, it’s just that here they are conspicuous by their absence – in a good way. It is nice to see a departure from the usual, even if it doesn’t completely work.

  • I’d like to state upfront that I am clearly not a part of this film’s target audience because I’ve never liked slapstick. But over the years, I have realised the core of why I don’t like them. I don’t find people insulting others, funny. And a lot of Judwaa 2’s humor relies on exactly that. Insult the obese, insult the colored, insult the women, insult those with speech defects – to name a few. I am sure the intention is not to insult but to bring laughs. But that insults bring laughs is a premise I have never understood.

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