• Hidden Figures tells us a genuinely inspirational story in obvious fashion, and is buoyed by the performances all around…

  • This is a film about how we all — Batman included, obviously — love something about the Batman, and it celebrates all of it. Even the shark-repellent.

    The magic lies in all those bricks coming together with a profoundly satisfying click.

  • This is by far the most credible an Indian sport film has ever felt, with even the commentators getting in on the action, giving most of us a tutorial in how to watch the sport.

    Dangal teaches us where rainbows lie in wrestling, and while it is a celebration of true greats — and true grit — this isn’t about one sport.

    India needs to watch this film for the way it puts the ‘her’ in ‘hero.’

  • This is a sublime cinematic experience, a rare joy that — to quote a song I always hear in Sinatra’s voice — left me Bewitched, Bothered And Bewildered.

    It is a film so special I had to watch it twice before writing about it, and you know what, La La Land? Everyone says I love you

  • It starts out shrill, turns predictable, and ends up chaotic.

    To use the language of the youth Aditya Chopra is attempting to speak, let’s call it Befi-cray-cray.

  • The actors are good and Sujoy Ghosh is tremendous at creating a textured Bengal setting, but this is a thriller which could have used more twists and smarts…

  • Dear Zindagi is a lovely picture, made with finesse and heart, and one that not only takes some stigma off the idea of seeking therapy, but — in the most natural of ways — goes a long way in making a viewer think of the people who matter most.

    The single smartest trick in this film, however, may well be the primary casting decision. Because a good therapist is a superstar.

  • The fundamental flaw in a film like this — other than the repetitive wowlessness of it all — is the fact that by creating too dry and no-nonsense protagonists instead of fleshing them out as characters, you end up failing the genre. There is only one thing a smashing action movie should aim to be: fantastic nonsense. 

  • Rock On 2 is a mediocre film.

    It is far too emo, with a hideous subplot about an aspiring musician rejected by his classical musician father, one who wears a shawl as committedly and constantly as Thakur did in Sholay.

  • Rock On 2 is a mediocre film.

    It is far too emo, with a hideous subplot about an aspiring musician rejected by his classical musician father, one who wears a shawl as committedly and constantly as Thakur did in Sholay.

Viewing item 1 to 10 (of 245 items)