• Lust Stories is out on Netflix, and I applaud these four distinct filmmakers for exploring this anthological format and still maintaining their originality of vision. Your mileage may vary on which film you like best, but it is heartening to watch these creators decode the idea of lust and never attempt to titillate. That would be too obvious. Carnality, after all, is only part of the equation. The headiness of lust lies also in the exhalation, the smile, the laugh. Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Come.

  • Pa Ranjith has some strong Leftist messaging and a lot to say about caste and colour, but all is lost within a mediocre film.

  • The vigilante film is well meaning and has good actors, but it is ultimately a boring effort.

  • Friends are the new family. Weddings are now as much about parents giving away the bride as they are about friends entrusting her to a man they approve of. Veere Di Wedding gets this fantastic bond right, and gives us four dramatically different kinds of women with agency and spirit. Nobody stands in the way of their decisions. Some girls will always choose to argue, just as some mothers will always choose to harangue. We haven’t seen these ladies on screen before, and they will serve as an awakening. India could do with an alarm call. Sometimes we need a movie to tell us what an orgasm means.

  • Deadpool 2 gets impressively emotional at the end, even when only pretending to be serious. The Domino sequences serve as a reminder that life is an elaborate Rube Goldberg machine, and there’s only that much we can do with luck. As this film shows, Deadpool pushes it.

  • Besides the intriguing bahu-spy premise, the film presents nothing new to inform the genre: spies have feelings, spies get sappy, spies cry. Even Bond films show us that these days. Gulzar does commendably depict how the other side is just like us – there is a rather clever use of the song Ae Watan, a patriotic track sung with equal fervour from both sides – but is the mere fact that this film does not thump its chest enough for applause?

  • 102 Not Out is, as I said, a sweet film. It’s nice to see an old Bachchan picture on the wall, circa Abhimaan, just as it is fine to see a photograph of a Khel Khel Mein Kapoor teaching his son math. Yet despite Bachchan and Kapoor – and young Jimit Trivedi, who plays the enthusiastic domestic help with infectious enthusiasm – the film relies too heavily on prosthetics, with liver spots being used either for laughs, or instead of character details. All we ever know about Dattatraya is his decrepitude. For a film about living a full life, that feels rather toothless.

  • Varun Dhawan Shines In This Exquisite Drama…Director Shoojit Sircar has made his bravest film, a poetic and emotional drama about unconditional affection

  • Rani Mukherji’s strong portrayal of a Tourette Syndrome sufferer emerges skin deep in a film that never goes beyond the obvious

  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is eventually a film about the need to point fingers. Mildred Hayes is out there hunting for arrests, hunting for someone to blame for an unthinkable, unjustifiable tragedy. At one point in the film, a character – unexpectedly – uses the word ‘begets’ correctly, as in “violence begets violence,” and that momentary lapse of stupidity is enough to protect her from wrath. The difference lies all in an instant. We can put up the labels on giant billboards – Good, Bad, Ugly, Guilty – but we only ever make our minds up as we drive past them, deciding along the way. This film is about reading between the signs.

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