• Kalank often feels too much, and I only wish it made me do the same. It is a stunningly plated meal, but needed salt.

  • John Abraham stars in a dumb movie about intelligence…A stiff John Abraham threatens to blend into the traditionally wood-panelled walls

  • More than anything else, this film is poetry. Photograph reminds us to believe in minor magic. Here is a film about a city that makes room for everything, from formulaic films to ghosts. Like when posing for a camera, all we need to know is where to look.

  • Amitabh Bachchan and Taapsee Pannu’s efficiently assembled film keeps tension at a boil through twist and counter-twist, but the finalé is easy to see coming.

  • Sonchiriya claims to be about a band of outlaws in wild search of a golden bird — but that bird may just be a goose. The film skims topics of caste, gender, religion and politics, and proves to be a film about the desperation to belong to something larger than oneself, the all-consuming desire to believe in something. Even birds of prey need to pray.

  • Faces common to every single Dhamaal/Golmaal movie make an appearance in the Ajay Devgn starrer but the only stars are Madhuri Dixit and Anil Kapoor, and it is tragic to see them languish thus.

  • Ranveer Singh and Alia Bhatt’s Gully Boy, an underdog story shining a light on India’s incipient hip-hop subculture, is the first great Hindi film of 2019 and a rousing celebration of spunk.

  • Ek Ladki Ko Dekhi Toh Aisa Laga concedes the unlikelihood of entertainment to change bigoted minds. When Sweety performs in Sahil’s play, we see disgusted and intolerant audiences get up and leave. Yet I was struck by the image of an old man, sobbing as he leans on the empty bench in front of him, reserved for VIPs who have left. There will be plenty who leave their seats unconvinced, but this film will make some wonder — many of whom may never have considered it. This could have been a bolder and more explicit film, but sometimes cinema should work like a street play. Sometimes we need to preach beyond the choir.

  • Kangana Ranaut is glorious, and the film better than Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s carnivals. But the budgetary constrains show and the impact is Amar Chitra Katha.

  • This is either an oblivious or blatantly self-aware film, a work not of propaganda as much as it is a work of pride, celebrating a legacy of violence.

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