• Guillermo Del Toro has always made sensationally strange movies, but with this one it is as if he, like his heroine, is finally unafraid to be beautiful.

  • Many films about relevant, important subjects are not actually good movies. R Balki’s PadMan, which features an extraordinary true-life story brought to the screen featuring Akshay Kumar is both a strong film and one that needs to be watched

  • The problem lies not in Padmaavat being a costume drama, but in the fact that there is too much costume, too little drama. In the film’s opening scene, we see a king chewing roughly on a piece of poultry. This is a surprisingly small, tandoori-sized handful of bird, nothing compared to the way we have, in international film and television, watched vikings gnaw at giant animal legs the size of motorcycles. Therein lies the problem. There’s not nearly enough meat.

  • Vineet’s compelling performance makes him a character to root for, and even if we are shown the odds too many times, his triumphs feel earned, they feel good

  • At an exhausting two hours and forty minutes, I really don’t care if Tiger is alive or a vegetable – whether he’s Zinda or Tinda, really – but this film needed to be much tighter.

  • Vidya Balan’s deals with real conflicts and dares to push some boundaries hard. It is a special film, the kind where you know what is going to happen and yet texture and detailing give you much to marvel at…

  • To me, the big and mysterious crime this film brings to light is the way Sidharth Malhotra now finds himself typecast as a novelist. It happened in Kapoor And Sons, and it happened here again, in this film that describes him as a “mashoor novelist” and where cops chase a murder suspect down the street yelling “Ei, writer!” as if it were an expletive. Then again, to those who make Hindi cinema these days, perhaps it is.

  • Thor Ragnarok is a true rock and roll original, and the reason it exists is because there’s a director who’s sure all that titters is gold.

  • Chef holds no secret sauce of its own, but perhaps we shouldn’t be that surprised. There is only that much you can do with a reheated film.

  • Amit Masurkar’s Newton is a dry and intriguing look at an India we don’t usually see – and shows us how hard it is to take elections seriously.

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