• Judwaa 2, like the original, isn’t a piece of art, in fact it’s mediocre, but it’s that one film which may lift your mood. At 149-minutes, this slapstick comedy has some really laugh-worthy moments.

  • Despite its 124-minute length, Haseena Parkar is a tedious watch. We already know whatever is shown there.

  • Newton is one of the finest political satires we have seen in the last couple of years. It refrains from taking sides and offers a humorous take on state versus the Maoists bloody battle. It raises questions on the importance of the electoral system we are so proud of. It takes us much beyond what we see. The team of Rajkummar Rao, Pankaj Tripathi, Raghuvir Yadav and Anjali Patil has come up with a top-notch performance. It’s a world waiting to be explored, so better do it now.

  • Lucknow Central fails to utilise its resources, especially Diana Penty, and loses out on a chance to become a really engaging film. Like Prison Break, it never reaps the benefits of a promising start.

  • Sunny and Bobby Deol and Shreyas Talpade resort to crass comedy at times, but the movie is funny often enough to recommend.

  • Baadshaho has too many ordinarily written characters jostling for whistle-worthy one-liners for 136-minutes. Eventually they run short of the steam and Baadshaho becomes a rehashed ‘90s story with some gloss and a lot of disappointment.

  • It’s a film pretending to be a stylishly raw gangster saga originated in the interiors of the Hindi heartland, but in reality, it’s nothing more than another attempt to look at the crime prone lower strata of society through a rose tinted glass. Sadly, Babumoshai Bandookbaaz never pierces our hearts.

  • Bareilly Ki Barfi is sweet and delightful. Its hilarious one-liners like, “Ye toh aastin ka anaconda nikla” and “Ye Bitti raat bhar kahan ghumti rehti hai, ladki hai koi chudail thode na hai,” totally work. This light-hearted comedy refrains from being slapstick and slowly weaves its charm. Worth a watch.

  • It’s a big disappointment to see Shah Rukh Khan returning to his comfort zone and yet not performing on top of his powers.

  • Mubarakan is designed as a family film where comedy is generated through quarrelling relatives. This works initially but goes out of control later.

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