• Kalank is the tale of forbidden love and star-crossed lovers. Alia Bhatt, Varun Dhawan, Madhuri Dixit, Sanjay Dutt, Aditya Roy Kapur and Sonakshi Sinha star in a film that deserves a watch ONLY for its visual extravaganza.

  • The main star of the film is its music. The many artistes who are credited for the music of the film do a classy job with the soundtrack. If Ranveer Singh is the life of Gully Boy, the music is its soul. The lyrics, the beats all scream revolution. Azadi. Hindustan gets its asli hip hop in a Bollywood film.

    In all, it fails to rise.

    Apna time aayega. But today is not the day.

  • Sonam Kapoor and Anil Kapoor, along with writer Gazal Dhaliwal and director Shelly Chopra Dhar, deliver a brilliant lesbian love story that Bollywood should be proud of.

  • The film takes off for Mars but gets its trajectory terribly wrong…

  • Kedarnath starring Sushant Singh Rajput marks the big Bollywood debut of star kid Sara Ali Khan. The film is directed by Abhishek Kapoor. Actors Sara and Sushant shine in Kedarnath but the film drowns, says our review.

  • There is hardly anything in the film that justifies the two-year wait that Aamir Khan made his fans go through. That is the problem of being a good actor with a nose for good scripts. Aamir Khan has built his reputation on good scripts. All of that is missing in his latest outing.

  • Sui Dhaaga starring Varun Dhawan and Anushka Sharma is director Sharat Katariya’s second film after Dum Laga Ke Haisha. The film is enjoyable in its little moments and nuances…

  • The film benefits from Amit Trivedi’s fabulous soundtrack. Songs like Daryaa and Halla stay with you after you leave the theatre. Rumi and Vicky stay with you after the end credits roll. But Manmarziyaan lets you go with the feeling that you’ve just seen Dev D from a Paro’s point of view. Except, a mediocre version.

  • Akshay Kumar shines in patriotic blockbuster…

  • Raazi is tightly paced and slick in its first half. It keeps you on the edge right till the time the lights in the theatre come back and the screen says ‘Intermission’.
    On the other side of that break, however, lies a not-so-impressive story. Raazi falters in its second half. The pace is compromised in taking care of the loose threads. Emotions teeter on the brink of melodrama but are pulled back in time, thankfully.

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