• No better actor to lead this charge than the fully fired-up Vicky Kaushal menacingly calm as a military mind – inspiring his peers, with an infectious energy that is impossible to resist

  • Zero jerkily jostles between heartland, rustic realism, and a far-out romantic fantasy, vaguely along the lines of Shah Rukh Khan’s Om Shanti Om. The only take-away is how tough it must’ve been to pull this off

  • Be that as it may, is this the sort of romance dream-debuts are made of? Traditionally, yes. Sara Ali Khan’s mother, Amrita Singh, for instance, similarly hit the screen with Betaab – rich girl, poor boy, young love – in the early ’80s.

  • Badhaai Ho, on late pregnancy, is just as funny, and as much fun; even as the point of the picture might seem progressively belaboured

  • …an artsy, gutsy mix of mythology, history, horror, and moral science. Do these elements seamlessly add up for you to naturally feel for the characters in the story? Honestly, no. Does the incredibly strong visual craftsmanship (rare for an Indian indie) satisfyingly guide you into a world hitherto unseen/unknown? Oh, absolutely.

  • The relentless drama that follows, by the minute, in the lives of the volatile lead couple (Vicky Kaushal, Taapsee Pannu) in unhinged love, will make you feel thoroughly relieved about your own staid existence though.

  • Rajkummar Rao, in absolute top form, plays this part to near perfection, adding yet another facet to his filmography that is probably as, if not more eclectic than any of his contemporaries’

  • While recounting encounters from 1948, it’s instructive, if not incredible, how this story on Indian sport remains just as relevant in 2018—looking chiefly at big victories being a result of private persistence, philanthropy, personal drive, rather than collective passion flowing from the top. This could be said about any recent, major Indian win, outside of cricket. As you can tell, we are kinda sold on Gold. Yup, you should be too.

  • For a second if you don’t imagine this to be a film at all, but a compelling conversation; its motive, and indeed its structure, will begin to make more sense to you…

  • For every sequence Irrfan is not on screen, you notice, the film suffers. Think you can say that for films in general — for all the time, for health reasons, he’s been compelled to stay away. This will make you want him back even more.

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