• A compromised film on the godmother of Nagpada…

  • Bhoomi is better dressed, better filmed and better performed than the old-fashioned revenge drama it actually is.

    And the big differentiator is that this film has Dutt showing us that his wrinkles have their own stories to tell. While the idea of an eye-for-an-eye and taking the law into one’s hands is hard to justify, Dutt’s performance is affecting. He’s tender, he’s tormented and helpless, and when he’s vengeful, you feel his pain.

  • Tiwari’s handling of the jail scenes are commendable even if the climax is a little contrived. And while this jailhouse rock-on see-saws between musical drama and message movie, its origins in a true story (about a real life prison band called Healing Hearts) and it’s notation on the merits of reformation give it soul.

  • With a gentler pace, less swag and more humane characters than the Ocean’s franchise, Lucky Logan comes with a twist, plenty of spirit and is gratifying in its own way.

  • Daddy demands patient viewing as it sets out to explore a new story delivery style while tackling the ever-popular gangster genre. As it walks the fine line between judgement and glorification, Daddy often feels like a bunch of headlines stitched together with fine handwriting managing to suck you back into a time that has shaped modern Mumbai.

  • The screenplay of Baadshaho is unduly non-linear and includes indulgent scenes like one of police torture. Baadshaho’s finale unfolds in a sandstorm and is the one scene that is visually arresting, though the story loses itself somewhere within the vortex.

  • The comic parts of A Gentleman score over the action and as an action-comedy is falls short of taking any real risks.

  • Instead of sticking to social satire, Toilet: Ek Prem Katha takes on the mantle of an extended propaganda film—it’s just as tiresome, but with better production values and performances.

  • Fortunately, the humour does not degenerate to crass double entendres. Family entertainment is clearly at the core and Mubarakan manages to deliver enough laughs.

  • Director Sabbir Khan and writer Vimi Datta have designed a film that is serviced by Shroff’s two skills – dancing and action. In spite of being predictable story with slack storytelling, Khan once again (Heropanti, Baaghi) showcases just what is needed to keep Shroff’s fans satisfied.

    Put in enough of these two elements and who cares about logic, story, acting or originality.

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